Safety Tips As Sledding Season Arrives Early!

Winter has arrived bringing the areas first (and latest in history) measurable snow of the season,  and by measurable we are talking over a foot in many areas! There are many ways of looking at this but I chose to take the positive approach! The big plus is that it’s the weekend, another positive is we are blessed with so many places to go sledding in the area.

We have been compiling a list of snow sledding venues for days like today & the entire winter season to come.

Please keep in mind that many venues may have been taken by surprise by the heavy snowfall amounts & are not open yet so please call or visit the websites, we provide you in each directory listing.

Some sites operate on the flag system Red Flag = No Sledding, Green Flag = Sledding.

Also remember sledding can also cause injuries, some of them pretty serious.  Each year tens of thousands of sledding cases are treated in emergency rooms across the snow belt, with more than 50% of them being serious Head Trauma. To keep yourself & your children safe, please follow these safety tips.

  • Select a hill that is age appropriate & not too steep, Ideally the hill will have a long flat area at the bottom for you to glide to a stop.
  • Always avoid hillsides that end near a street or parking lot.
  • Always avoid hillsides that end near ponds, trees, fences or other hazards.
  • Never ride a sled that is being pulled by a moving vehicle.
  • Always sit face-forward on your sled.
  • Young kids (5 and under) should sled with an adult, and kids younger than 12 should be actively watched at all times.
  • Go down the hill one at a time and with only one person per sled (except for adults with young children).
  • Never build an artificial jump or obstacle on a sledding hill.
  • Keep your arms and legs within the sled at all times, and if you fall off the sled, move out of the way. If you find yourself on a sled that won’t stop, roll off it and get away from it.
  • Walk up the side of the hill and leave the middle open for other sledders.
  • Never ride a sled that is being pulled by a moving vehicle.
  • Always make sure the hill is free of obstacles such as jumps, bumps, rocks, poles, or trees  & other sledders before you head downhill.
  • Try to avoid icy hills, An icy slope makes for a much faster ride s well as a much harder landing if you fall off your sled.
  • Sled during the daytime, or on illuminated hills at night where visibility is better.
  • Young kids (5 and under) should always sled with an adult, and kids younger than 12 should be actively watched at all times.
  • Always go down the hill one at a time and with only one person per sled (except for adults with young children).
  • Never build an artificial jump, ramp or other obstacle on a sledding hill.
  • Keep your arms and legs within the sled at all times, and if you fall off the sled, move out of the way. If you find yourself on a sled that won’t stop, roll off it and get away from it.
  • Always alk up the side of the hill, never walk up the middle or high traffic sledding lanes.
  • Always wear a safety helmet that fits correctly to prevent head injuries

Following these basic common sense safety tips can not guarantee everyone’s safety but will help prevent accidents & injuries that can ruin a fun day at your favorite sledding hill.