Walking The Lakeshore Path In Lake Geneva Wisconsin

Lake Geneva has been the favorite retreat of Chicago folks for 150 years, and everybody who was anybody had a place there: the Wrigleys, Maytags and Schwinns, but also cartoonists, actors, brewers and bottle-cap makers.

Geneva will seem citified to people who vacation on woodland lakes. There’s a good reason to go there, though: It’s entertaining to gawk at extreme wealth, and… click here to continue

U.S. Postal Service Letters FROM Santa Program Begins Today

Postal Service Letters FROM Santa Program
Receive Santa’s Personalized Response to Your Child’s Letter!
A Great Photo Opportunity to Treasure for Years

NORTH POLE — Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus — and the Postal Service can help you prove it when Santa replies to your child’s letter,  complete with a North Pole postmark.
Here are the steps for your child to get a letter back from Santa:

  1. Have your child write a letter to Santa and place it in an envelope addressed to: Santa Claus, North Pole.
  2. Later, when alone, open the envelope and write a personalized response.
  3. Insert the response letter into an envelope and address it to the child.
  4. Add the return address: SANTA, NORTH POLE, to the envelope.
  5. Ensure the envelope is affixed with a First-Class Mail stamp, such as a recently issued Charlie Brown Christmas stamp.
  6. Place the complete envelope into a larger envelope — preferably a Priority Mail Flat Rate Envelope — with appropriate postage, and address it to:

North Pole Postmark
Postmaster
4141 Postmark Drive
Anchorage, AK 99530-9998

“Letters from Santa” must be received by the Anchorage, AK postmaster no later than Dec. 15. Santa’s helpers at the Postal Service, will take care of the rest.

Letters to Santa holiday fact sheet (PDF)

Be sure to share the experience on social media using #LettersFromSanta.

Tips

  • To save paper, write on the back of your child’s letter. If you keep them together, your child will also be able to recall what he or she wrote.
  • When responding as Santa, make the response as personal as possible by highlighting your child’s accomplishments over the past year. For example, helping around the house, receiving good grades in a particular subject at school or participating in community service activities.
  • This is a great activity for Thanksgiving that the whole family can enjoy, including parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles and other caregivers.

The Letters from Santa program adds to the excitement of Christmas and is ideal for interesting youngsters in letter writing, stamps and penmanship.

Safety Tips As Sledding Season Arrives Early!

Winter has arrived bringing the areas first (and latest in history) measurable snow of the season,  and by measurable we are talking over a foot in many areas! There are many ways of looking at this but I chose to take the positive approach! The big plus is that it’s the weekend, another positive is we are blessed with so many places to go sledding in the area.

We have been compiling a list of snow sledding venues for days like today & the entire winter season to come.

Please keep in mind that many venues may have been taken by surprise by the heavy snowfall amounts & are not open yet so please call or visit the websites, we provide you in each directory listing.

Some sites operate on the flag system Red Flag = No Sledding, Green Flag = Sledding.

Also remember sledding can also cause injuries, some of them pretty serious.  Each year tens of thousands of sledding cases are treated in emergency rooms across the snow belt, with more than 50% of them being serious Head Trauma. To keep yourself & your children safe, please follow these safety tips.

  • Select a hill that is age appropriate & not too steep, Ideally the hill will have a long flat area at the bottom for you to glide to a stop.
  • Always avoid hillsides that end near a street or parking lot.
  • Always avoid hillsides that end near ponds, trees, fences or other hazards.
  • Never ride a sled that is being pulled by a moving vehicle.
  • Always sit face-forward on your sled.
  • Young kids (5 and under) should sled with an adult, and kids younger than 12 should be actively watched at all times.
  • Go down the hill one at a time and with only one person per sled (except for adults with young children).
  • Never build an artificial jump or obstacle on a sledding hill.
  • Keep your arms and legs within the sled at all times, and if you fall off the sled, move out of the way. If you find yourself on a sled that won’t stop, roll off it and get away from it.
  • Walk up the side of the hill and leave the middle open for other sledders.
  • Never ride a sled that is being pulled by a moving vehicle.
  • Always make sure the hill is free of obstacles such as jumps, bumps, rocks, poles, or trees  & other sledders before you head downhill.
  • Try to avoid icy hills, An icy slope makes for a much faster ride s well as a much harder landing if you fall off your sled.
  • Sled during the daytime, or on illuminated hills at night where visibility is better.
  • Young kids (5 and under) should always sled with an adult, and kids younger than 12 should be actively watched at all times.
  • Always go down the hill one at a time and with only one person per sled (except for adults with young children).
  • Never build an artificial jump, ramp or other obstacle on a sledding hill.
  • Keep your arms and legs within the sled at all times, and if you fall off the sled, move out of the way. If you find yourself on a sled that won’t stop, roll off it and get away from it.
  • Always alk up the side of the hill, never walk up the middle or high traffic sledding lanes.
  • Always wear a safety helmet that fits correctly to prevent head injuries

Following these basic common sense safety tips can not guarantee everyone’s safety but will help prevent accidents & injuries that can ruin a fun day at your favorite sledding hill.

 

Canadian Pacific Holiday Train To Make Stops In The WI-IL Border Area!

​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​CP’s Holiday Train ready to brighten communities and warm hearts for the 17th year

Every year, our Holiday Trains travel through dozens of communities, raising food and cash donations for North American food banks.

Again this year, the Holiday Train program is encouraging people attending events to bring heart healthy donations. Heart health education and awareness is a tenet of CP’s community investment program, CP Has Heart, which focuses on improving the heart health of men, women and children in communities across North America.

The two brightly lit trains will kick off in the Montreal area on November 27 and 28 on their way to visit approximately 150 communities. The “Canadian Train” travels west across Canada finishing its journey in Port Coquitlam, British Columbia. The “US Train” visits communities across the U.S. Northeast and Midwest, and returns back to Canada for shows in Saskatchewan and Alberta. ​

The concerts are always free, but you’re encouraged to make a donation to the local food bank — either a non-perishable food item or a cash donation. All contributions will stay in your community.

This year’s 1st stop for the holiday train in the WI IL Border Region arrive at 3:40 PM on December 4, 2015 in Gurnee, Il, The event run from 4:00 – 4:30 P.M. @ The Viking Middle School Park  ​4460 Old Grand Ave. The scheduled performers are Kira Isabella and Doc Walker

The 2nd stop for the holiday train in the WI IL Border Region arrive at 5:25 PM on December 4, 2015 in Sturtevant, Wi, The show will run from 5:35 – 6:05 P.M. @ 9900 East Exploration Ct. The scheduled performers are Kira Isabella and Doc Walker

 

The concerts are always free, but you are encouraged to make a donation to the local food bank – either a non-perishable food item or a cash donation. All contributions will stay in your community.